DepartmentsOpenings

San Francisco Openings: Zombie Village, Tory Burch and The Cloud Club

By Catherine Bigelow

A Taste of the Tropics

Zombie Village 441 Jones Street; thezombievillage.com

The exotic ambiance of Polynesian culture blooms again — in full-technicolor plumage — at Zombie Village, a high temple of tiki recently opened by Future Bar impresarios Brian Sheehy and Doug Dalton. Officially launched in early January atop the bones of their previous Tradition bar in the Tenderloin, this effort heralds the 12th establishment in the dynamic duo’s cocktail empire. It’s spearheaded by Daniel “Doc” Parks, a veritable tiki god among enthusiasts who, nightly, clamor for photos with Parks in a South Seas rattan “Queen” chair.

“Between tense national politics and stressful Bay Area living, our guests feel like they’ve been transported to a tropical vacation,” says Sheehy, co-founder of the equally popular Pagan Idol in the Financial District. “People from around the country seek us out: Tiki is a destination experience and lifestyle.”

The cocktail menu featuring 40 creations, many starring rum — from the frozen disco banana ($11) to a classic communal scorpion bowl ($30) — isn’t the fastest pour in town because the ingredients are so intricate. Sheehy and Dalton were inspired by the Bay’s first era of tiki, founded post-WWII by “Trader” Vic Bergeron and Skipper Kent, who initially staked out his Zombie Village umbrella across the street from Trader Vic’s inaugural outpost in Oakland.

Eve Bergeron, granddaughter of the storied Trader, donated some memorabilia to the new Zombie Village. But the space (exquisitely tricked-out in a Polynesian-noir design by tiki artist Ivan Mora) also pays homage to Skipper Kent, who later served Singapore slings at his eponymous North Beach joint, now home to Kennedy’s Irish Pub and Curry House.

Like all the Future Bar redoubts, no food is served — unless one counts drinks garnished with edible octopus tentacles or a coconut Popsicle. And reservations are only required for the eight semi-private thatched tiki huts (2-10 guests) featuring table service and expert tiki-lore talk.

Tory Burch 222 Stockton Street

It will be an easy shopping jaunt for members of the excloo Town & Country Club, the nation’s second-oldest women’s social club, when the Tory Burch boutique empire opens its first San Francisco flagship downstairs. Located on Stockton Street at Maiden Lane, the glass-walled corner space (formerly Arthur Beren Shoes) is housed in a classic red-brick Georgian building owned by the club.

The Tory Burch interior features new design concepts — including floor-to-ceiling windows, oak floors, brass étagères, white bespoke lounges, and a living lattice abloom with ivy, lemons and white blossoms — inspired by the fashion house’s SS19 runway show. Also available among the Tory Burch ready-to-wear collection: handbags, shoes, accessories, fragrances, home decor.

“There is no other city like San Francisco. I love the people, the art and, of course, the architecture,” enthuses Tory Burch, chief creative officer at her namesake. “We have been wanting to find the perfect location and are thrilled to open in Union Square.”

The Cloud Club 24 Willie Mays Plaza

For the 2019 season during home games at Oracle Park, the San Francisco Giants launch The Cloud Club, a new members-only sodality (with circumscribed availability) for corporate clients and business professionals. Set in a shared yet exclusive and luxe entertainment lounge (with a capacity of 140-150, plus 60 external seats) located on the suite level, this state-of-the-art social space (framed by sweeping ballpark and Bay views) weaves together the arts and culture of San Francisco through experiential decor, food and beverage offerings. The “on demand” seating-and-hospitality concept (also managed via The Cloud Club app) is an all-inclusive game-day package providing “last minute” (as available) and flexible buy-ins for club clients to engage their guests (12-20) with a full roster of entertainment, networking and … baseball.

Tags

Related Articles

Check Also

Close
Back to top button
Close